Crochet V-Neck Sweater Vest | Free Pattern & Tutorial

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This crochet pattern for a basic v-neck sweater vest features half double crochet ribbing and double crochet for the main part. Its simple shape and coloring result in this classic wardrobe staple that will work in many different outfits! This pattern is for crocheters who already have at least a little experience crocheting.

crochet sweater vest

V-Neck

In crochet, v-necks are typically more difficult to make than other necklines, at least in my opinion, but it’s definitely worth the extra effort!

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V-necks can make the neck area look more flattering by making the neck look longer and slimmer. They are also versatile in dressing both down or up! You can wear it with something more casual for an everyday look or wear it with a collared button up for a more professional look. Lastly, you can easily accessorize with necklaces!

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Difficulty

Although not super complicated, it does use simple shaping techniques that an absolute beginner may struggle with. But, by all means, if you’re up for the challenge! In the video tutorial, I go over each new stitch, so it is possible to make this without having any experience crocheting.

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If you’d like something a little easier, try this easy ribbed sweater or this two-tone raglan sweater!

Diagram & Overview

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This pattern is worked in one piece, from the bottom up. Here is an overview of the process from start to finish:

  1. Ribbing for both the front and back.
  2. Body for both the front and back.
  3. Split and shape the armholes for just the front panel.
  4. Finish shaping the armholes and start shaping the v-neck for just the front panel.
  5. Finish shaping v-neck for just the front panel.
  6. Shape armholes and neckline for the back panel.
  7. Ribbing for neckline and armholes.

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Video Tutorial

You can follow along with my YouTube video to crochet your very own v-neck sweater vest! I have timestamps included to section the video and help you jump to any point you need to!

This post may contain affiliate links. I may earn a small commission on qualifying purchases at no additional cost to you!

Materials

Dimensions

40.5 centimeters wide x 48 centimeters long

Additional dimensions with images will be listed at the end!

Gauge

10 rows of 15 double crochets makes a 10 x 10cm square

Notes and Tips

  • This pattern is written using US crochet terms
  • The chain 2 at the beginning of each round/row does NOT count as a double crochet
  • Leave extra space in the armholes and neck hole for the ribbing
  • Pull all loose ends to the inside of the sweater vest and weave them to hide them

Abbreviations

ch = chain

dc = double crochet

dc2tog = double crochet 2 together

dc3tog = double crochet 3 together

blo = back loop only

hdc = half double crochet

rep = repeat

sk = skip

sl st = slip stitch

st = stitch


Bottom Ribbing

Foundation: Slipknot, ch10 + 1 turning ch (or however long for ribbing width)

Row 1: hdc across, starting in 2nd ch from the hook (10)

Row 2: ch 1, turn, hdc across in blo

Rows 3 – 80 (must be a multiple of 8): Repeat row 2 until the piece can stretch to fully wrap around the largest part of your upper body

Joining Sides: ch 1, turn

Grab the piece from the middle so the ends lay on top of each other.

Sl st through both layers through the front loop of each hdc on the top layer and through the bottom of each chain on the bottom layer.

Rotate 90 degrees clockwise to work along side of the rows.

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Body

Round 1: ch2, dc in the side of each row and each ridge (3 per every 2 rows), sl st (120, must be divisible by 4)

The number of stitches for your first row should be 1.5 times the number of rows of ribbing you did. Since I did 80 rows, and 80*1.5 = 120, I have 120 stitches at the end of the round.

By doing 3 stitches every 2 rows, your first row should lay pretty flat (as long as your tension is not too loose or tight). The ribbing shouldn’t be flared out or stretched out. It should be straight, lining up with your rows on the body.

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Round 2 – 17: ch2, turn, dc around, sl st

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After 17 rounds, the total vertical length is about 21.5 centimeters. If you have a longer torso or just want the sweater vest to be longer, you can add more rows until you’re ready to start the armholes.

Front Armholes

Now, we’re going to make the space for our armholes and, instead of working in the round, we’re going to work in rows for just the front of the sweater vest. We’ll split the 120 stitches in half and work over 60 stitches for the front panel.

Mark the stitch after the 60th stitch for the next row.

Row 1: ch2, turn, dc3tog, dc across leaving 3 before st marker, dc3tog (56)

Row 2 – 3: ch2, turn, dc3tog, dc across leaving last 3 st, dc3tog (52, 48)

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If you want the neckline to be higher, you can add more rows before starting it. And if you bring the armholes in far enough before you start the neckline, you can skip the decreases at the armholes when shaping the neckline.

Front Neckline 1

Now, we can start shaping the v-neck. Since our last round has 48 stitches, we’ll divide it in half so each side of the v-neck has 24 stitches.

Mark the stitch after the 24th stitch for the next row.

Row 4: ch2, turn, dc3tog, dc across leaving 2 before st marker, dc2tog (21)

Row 5: ch2, turn, dc2tog, dc across leaving last 3 st, dc3tog (18)

Row 6: ch2, turn, dc3tog, dc across leaving last 2 st, dc2tog (15)

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Now, the armhole has been brought in far enough and we can stop decreasing on the side with the armholes. We will continue decreasing at the side with the v-neck.

Row 7: ch2, turn, dc2tog, dc across (14)

Row 8: ch2, turn, dc across leaving last 2 st, dc2tog (13)

Rows 9 – 19: Rep rows 7 – 8 (12, 11,…, 2)

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If you want to lower the neckline and make the overall sweater vest longer without making the neckhole bigger, you can do regular rows with no decreases.

And just a note, the sweater vest you see in the beginning of the tutorial and in the thumbnail has 5 of these extra rows with no decreases, so it’s a little longer. The rest of the tutorial is shown without these extra 5 rows, but it doesn’t make much of a difference for the rest of the tutorial.

Row 20 – 24 (not in tutorial): ch2, turn dc across

Fasten off, leaving long tail. We’ll use this tail to sew the shoulder seam.

Front Neckline 2

This portion is just mirroring the other side.

Row 4: Attach yarn to st marker, ch2, dc2tog, dc across leaving last 3 st, dc3tog (21)

Row 5: ch2, turn, dc3tog, dc across leaving last 2 st, dc2tog (18)

Row 6: ch2, turn, dc2tog, dc across leaving last 3 st, dc3tog (15)

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Row 7: ch2, turn, dc across leaving last 2 st, dc2tog (14)

Row 8: ch2, turn, dc2tog, dc across leaving last 2 st (13)

Rows 9 – 19: Rep rows 7 – 8 (12, 11,…, 2)

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Row 20 – 24 (not in tutorial): ch2, turn dc across

Fasten off, leaving long tail. We’ll use this tail to sew the shoulder seam.

Back Armholes


Row 1: Attach yarn to 61st st, ch2, dc3tog, dc across leaving last 3 st, dc3tog (56)

Row 2 – 6: ch2, turn, dc3tog, dc across leaving last 3 st, dc3tog (52, 48)

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Row 7 – 13: ch2, turn, dc across

Note: I did an extra 5 rows for a total of 18 for my final sweater vest (not shown in tutorial)

Back Neckline 1

Now, we can shape the back neckline, and I’ll do it by double crocheting 3 stitches together at the middle. We need to determine how many stitches we need before we do a double crochet 3 together.

Since we have 13 rows so far for this back panel and we have 19 total for the front, we need 6 more rows. And since we ended with 2 stitches on the front panel, we need to end with 2 stitches at the end of the 6 rows. The decrease removes 2 stitches per row, so 6 rows will remove 12 stitches. That means, we need to start with 14 stitches to have 2 at the end.

We’re going to do 11 double crochets, then a double crochet 3 together. Then, we’ll do the 6 rows with the decrease only at the neckline.

Row 14: ch2, turn, dc in each of next 11 st, dc3tog (12)

Row 15: ch2, turn, dc3tog, dc across (10)

Row 16: ch2, turn, dc across leaving last 3 st, dc3tog (8)

Rows 17 – 19: Rep rows 15 – 16 (6, 4, 2)

Do not fasten off. We’ll have less loose ends when we pick this back up later when we do the armhole ribbing. If you prefer 2 extra loose ends over leaving the yarn attached, you can fasten off now and attach is back here later on.

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Back Neckline 2

This portion is just mirroring the other side.

Row 14: Attach yarn to 14 st from left, ch2, dc3tog, dc across (12)

Row 15: ch2, turn, dc across leaving last 3 st, dc3tog (10)

Row 16: ch2, turn, dc3tog, dc across (8)

Rows 17 – 19: Rep rows 15 – 16 (6, 4, 2)

Do not fasten off. We’ll have less loose ends when we pick this back up later when we do the armhole ribbing. If you prefer 2 extra loose ends over leaving the yarn attached, you can fasten off now and attach is back here later on.

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Sewing Shoulders


With the long tails end from the front side, whip stitch the 2 st on the front panel to the st on the back panel to connect the tops of the shoulders together.

Neckline Ribbing

Before doing the ribbing, we’re going to do a single crochet border to make the ribbing a little easier. This is optional; if you want, you can skip this row and do the ribbing straight into the side of the rows.

Optional: Using yarn still attached along neckline, ch1, sc around neckline, doing 2 per row, sl st, fasten off (128)

Now, we’ll do the ribbing. I chose to do 5 half double crochets in each row of my ribbing, but you can make it shorter or longer if you want.

Row 1: Attach yarn to 5th st to the right of the V-neck point, ch1, hdc across each of the next 5 st, sl st

Row 2: sl st2tog, turn, hdc in blo across

Row 3: ch1, turn, hdc in blo across, sl st

Row 4 – 67: Rep rows 2 – 3 all the way around neckline, doing sl st3tog instead of sl st2tog every 3rd time

I’ve found that alternating in a sl st3tog every 3rd time results in the ribbing being stretched just the right amount. If yours is too loose, you can do slip stitch 3 togethers every 2nd time, and if it’s too tight, you can do the slip stitch 3 togethers every 4th time.

Fasten off with long tail end.

Sew the top of the last row to the side of the first 3 rows.

Armhole Ribbing

Using yarn still attached along armhole:

Optional: ch1, sc around armhole, doing 2 per row, sl st

I made the armhole ribbing the same width as my neckline ribbing (5 hdc), but you can adjust the width by adjusting the number of chains in the first row.

Row 1: ch6, hdc across, starting in 2nd ch from the hook, sl st (5)

Row 2: sl st2tog, turn, hdc in blo across

Row 3: ch1, turn, hdc in blo across, sl st

Row 4 – 56: Rep rows 2 – 3 all the way around armhole, doing sl st3tog instead of sl st2tog every 3rd time

Attach yarn to other armhole and repeat ribbing.

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Finishing

Make sure that all loose ends are knotted and pull them to the inside of the sweater vest to hide.

Weave in all loose ends securely.

Now, your crochet sweater vest is complete!

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The finished sweater vest with those 5 extra rows measures about 40.5 centimeters wide and 48 centimeters long. With 5 rows less, it is 42 centimeters long.

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Additional Dimensions

Width across shoulders: 29 centimeters

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Neck hole width: 13 centimeters

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Neck hole length: 17 centimeters

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Armhole length: 20.5 centimeters

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9 Comments

  1. What size is this vest? Do you have any suggestions for increasing the size? I wear a women’s medium (size 8 – 10?). I love this pattern but don’t want it to be too snug. Thanks.

    1. It’s an x-small (0-2)! The number of rows you do in the ribbing will determine the size. I would do slightly shorter than the circumference you want since it will stretch slightly once you put in your stitches along the side.

  2. Hi, first of all, thank you for the great tutorial! I just finished the neckline ribbing but I don’t know how to start the armhole ribbing since the tutorial doesn’t explain that part. My first thought would be to chain five after finishing the single crochet border and then continuing with the hdc, is that correct?

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